Sustainability

Long-lasting change comes from within individuals and within communities. Against this backdrop, in 2015, Sappi SA launched the Abashintshi (’Changers’ in isiZulu) programme.
Driving holistic Enterprise and Supplier Development
Small businesses have been called ‘the backbone of any economy’. They fuel local growth and development, sustain workers in meaningful employment and provide vital services.
In November 2019, we announced our intention to make investments totalling up to ZAR14 billion over the next six years in our South African operations.
Mapping the new world of climate change
A preliminary climate change investigation conducted by Sappi Forests’ scientists indicated that climate change is likely to be greater in Southern Africa compared to the world average.
A multi-pronged response to climate change
Climate change can stress forests and plantations through higher mean annual temperatures, altered precipitation patterns and more frequent and extreme weather conditions.
High demand for a high-performance fluting grade, UltraFlute, produced at Tugela Mill, increased the internal requirements for high-quality neutral sulphite semi-chemical (NSCC) pulp from the semi-chemical cooking process.
Saiccor Mill and wastewater
The world’s oceans are under increasing pressure, which is why it’s important to maintain marine biodiversity. That’s the overarching focus of the Saiccor Mill outfall monitoring programme.
Balancing the 3Ps at Saiccor Mill
Project Vulindlela is our multi-billion-rand expansion project to boost Saiccor Mill’s dissolving pulp (DP) capacity by 110,000 tons per annum. The project has significant benefits for people, the planet and prosperity in South Africa.
Reintroducing South Africa’s most endangered tree into communities
Endemic to the forests of Southern Africa (Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe), the Pepper-bark tree (Warburgia salutaris) is considered Endangered at the global level according to the IUCN Red List.
Creating spaces to connect with nature
Nature reserves are becoming more and more important in an increasingly urbanised world. Only by spending time in protected places do we have a sense of how rich in birds, flowers and insects our countryside could be.

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